Cystoscopy


Cystoscopy (sis-TOS-kuh-pee) is a procedure that allows your doctor to view the inside of the bladder and urethra. The procedure can be used to diagnose bladder tumors and to identify obstruction of the bladder.

What to expect:

Cystoscopy is usually performed as an outpatient procedure in your doctor’s office or at a surgical center. Prior to the procedure, you will need to empty your bladder. You will then be positioned on an examination table. After administration of local anesthesia, a cystoscope (a thin, lighted tube) will be inserted through the urethra into the bladder. Water or saline will then be instilled into the bladder through the cystoscope. As the fluid fills the bladder, the bladder wall stretches, allowing detailed viewing by your doctor.

If any tissue in the bladder wall appears abnormal, a small sample can be removed through the cystoscope for analysis. After the cystoscope is removed, the urethra may be sore, and you may feel a burning sensation for approximately 72 hours. If discomfort persists, fever develops or your urine appears bright red, contact your physician.